Thinking

A small conversation about mental health has the power to make a big difference

As a chartered Sport and Exercise psychologist, normalising seeking out professional help for your brain is something I am really passionate about.

A-small-conversation-about-mental-health-has-the-power-to-make-a-big-difference-featured-image-Clarasys.

As a chartered Sport and Exercise psychologist, normalising seeking out professional help for your brain is something I am really passionate about. At Clarasys, we have a monthly series where different people from across the business share their experiences of therapy, in the hope that others who might be reluctant to get the support they need, feel more comfortable doing so moving forward. 

So far, we’ve heard from senior leadership and a range of people from across our consulting team who have all shared their experiences of therapy and given helpful advice and insight into the process. 

Each person has shared their unique perspective covering topics from how going to therapy can sometimes be an unpleasant but necessary experience; that you don’t need to stick with the first therapist that you speak to; how your therapy can help your family too; and how therapy can help with working through some long-standing beliefs about yourself. 

The sharing of these experiences has led to some great conversations across the business, allowing others to be more open about expressing how they are feeling and normalising discussions around mental health. 

When things are bad in your brain, it can feel like you are the only person who is experiencing these things and the fear of judgement can be really scary, particularly in a work environment. By hearing stories of other people who have gone through similar things it can help to make people feel less alone when they are struggling. 

1 in 4 adults in the UK are expected to experience mental health challenges in any given year.1 At Clarasys, we want to create an environment where everyone feels they can be open about what is going on inside their head and this series is a great way to start that conversation. 

References

  1. NHS UK